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ADSA

​ADSA was formed in 1985 for the purpose of ensuring that its member companies offer superior levels of safety for pedestrian automatic doors.

ADSA exists to promote the highest standards in automatic doors and to help specifiers and customers obtain the best solution for their requirements. ADSA first developed the industry code of practice. This covers the safety aspects of automatic doors for pedestrian use. This subsequently formed the basis of BS 7036: 1988, a code of practice for provision and installation of safety devices for automatic, power operated pedestrian door systems.

With advances in technology and the introduction of new safety devices, ADSA then developed to the updated standard BS 7036: 1996 covering safety of powered doors for pedestrian use. This was complemented by a written test taken by anyone involved in the industry who undertakes operations covered by The British Standard.

ADSA is actively involved in the formulation of European-wide standards. This resulted in standard BS EN 16005 – 2012, which replaced BS 7036 in April 2013. All members are fully committed to this standard and its associated testing.

ADSA member companies supply over 75% of the UK market. They can advise on every aspect of automatic doors, from the initial selection and specification, through to installation in order to ensure that clients end up with the right type of door for their particular requirements.

Automatic doors aren’t just aesthetically pleasing. They can help regulate climate control in an entrance area whilst also offering a functional solution for people of all ages and abilities, particularly when viewed in compliance with the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and the Equality Act 2010.

For ADSA our work on technical standards is paramount. We have representatives on technical standard committees including;

MHE/031 Automatic Power Operated Pedestrian Doors

B/538/01 Windows and Doors

B/538/02 Doors

B/538/15 Finger Traps

MHE/031 UK Mirror Group

B/559 Access to Buildings for Disabled People

BS 7036-0 Risk assessment for BS EN 16005

​Oxfordshire[a] is a landlocked county in the far west of the government statistical region of South East England. The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west.

The county has major education and tourist industries, and is noted for concentrations of performance motorsport, car manufacturing and technology companies. The University of Oxford is widely considered one of the leading universities in the world, and is linked to a concentration of local technology and science activities at locations such as the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, while Oxford University Press is the largest firm among a concentration of print and publishing firms.

As well as the city of Oxford, other centres of population are Banbury, Bicester, Kidlington and Chipping Norton to the north of Oxford; Carterton and Witney to the west; Thame and Chinnor to the east; and Abingdon-on-Thames, Wantage, Didcot, Wallingford and Henley-on-Thames to the south. All its zones south of the Thames: the Vale of White Horse and parts of South Oxfordshire were within the historic county of Berkshire, including the highest point, the 261-metre (856 ft) White Horse Hill.[5]

Oxfordshire's county flower is the snake's-head fritillary.[6]