Banner Default Image

British StandardBS 7671"Requirements for Electrical Installations. IET Wiring Regulations", informally called in the electrical communityThe "Regs", is the national standard in theUnited Kingdomfor electrical installation and the safety ofelectrical wiringin domestic, commercial, industrial, and other buildings, also in special installations and locations, such as marinas or caravan parks and medical locations[1]

In general, BS 7671 applies to circuits supplied at nominal voltages (Uo) up to and including 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC. The standard therefore covers the Extra Low Voltage (ELV) range (0-50V AC, 0-125V DC), and the Low Voltage (LV) range (50-1000V AC, 125-1500V DC). The frequencies covered for AC are 50 Hz, 60 Hz, and 400 Hz, used in the UK for houses, offices, and commerce. It did not become a recognizedBritish Standarduntil the publication of the 16th edition in 1992. The standard takes account of the technical substance of agreements reached inCENELEC.[2]

The current version is BS 7671:2018 (the 18th Edition) issued in 2018 and came into effect from 1 January 2019.[3]Amendment 1 to the 18th Edition was published in February 2020 but the only changes were to section 722 (Electric Vehicle Charging Installations). These changes came into immediate effect upon publication release, unlike previous amendments where 6 months elapsed before changes became compliant.[4]BS 7671 is also used as a national standard byMauritius,St Lucia,Saint Vincent and the Grenadines,Sierra Leone,Singapore,Sri Lanka,Trinidad and Tobago,Uganda,Cyprus, and several other countries, which base their wiring regulations on

​Downham Market, sometimes simply referred to as Downham, is a market town and civil parish in Norfolk, England. It lies on the edge of the Fens, on the River Great Ouse, approximately 11 miles south of King's Lynn, 39 miles west of Norwich and 30 miles north of Cambridge.[2]

The civil parish has an area of 5.2 km² and in the 2011 census had a population of 9,994 in 4,637 households.[3]

Fire Station in 2006, now a heritage centre

It was an agricultural centre, developing as a market for the produce of the Fens with a bridge across the Ouse. During the Middle Ages, it was famed for its butter market and also hosted a notable horse fair. The market is now held Fridays and Saturdays.

Notable buildings in the town include its mediaeval parish church, dedicated to St Edmund, and the Victorian clock tower, constructed in 1878. The town is also known as the place where Charles I hid after the Battle of Naseby. In 2004 the town completed a regeneration project on the Market Place, moving the market to the town hall car park. The decorative town sign depicts the crown and arrows of St Edmund with horses to show the importance of the horse fairs in the town's history.

A heritage centre, Discover Downham, opened in a former fire station in 2016.[4] The town is twinned with Civray, Vienne, France.[5]

Latest jobs