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British StandardBS 7671"Requirements for Electrical Installations. IET Wiring Regulations", informally called in the electrical communityThe "Regs", is the national standard in theUnited Kingdomfor electrical installation and the safety ofelectrical wiringin domestic, commercial, industrial, and other buildings, also in special installations and locations, such as marinas or caravan parks and medical locations[1]

In general, BS 7671 applies to circuits supplied at nominal voltages (Uo) up to and including 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC. The standard therefore covers the Extra Low Voltage (ELV) range (0-50V AC, 0-125V DC), and the Low Voltage (LV) range (50-1000V AC, 125-1500V DC). The frequencies covered for AC are 50 Hz, 60 Hz, and 400 Hz, used in the UK for houses, offices, and commerce. It did not become a recognizedBritish Standarduntil the publication of the 16th edition in 1992. The standard takes account of the technical substance of agreements reached inCENELEC.[2]

The current version is BS 7671:2018 (the 18th Edition) issued in 2018 and came into effect from 1 January 2019.[3]Amendment 1 to the 18th Edition was published in February 2020 but the only changes were to section 722 (Electric Vehicle Charging Installations). These changes came into immediate effect upon publication release, unlike previous amendments where 6 months elapsed before changes became compliant.[4]BS 7671 is also used as a national standard byMauritius,St Lucia,Saint Vincent and the Grenadines,Sierra Leone,Singapore,Sri Lanka,Trinidad and Tobago,Uganda,Cyprus, and several other countries, which base their wiring regulations on

​Great Yarmouth, often called Yarmouth, is a seaside resort and minster town in Norfolk, England, straddling the River Yare, some 20 miles (30 km) east of Norwich.[2] A population of 38,693 in the 2011 Census made it Norfolk's third most populous place. Its fishing industry, mainly for herring, fell steeply after the mid-20th century and has all but vanished.[3] North Sea oil from the 1960s brought an oil-rig supply industry that now services offshore natural gas rigs. More recent offshore wind power and other renewable energy have created further support services. Yarmouth has been a seaside resort since 1760 and a gateway from the Norfolk Broads to the North Sea. Tourism was boosted when a railway opened in 1844, which gave visitors easier, cheaper access and triggered some settlement. Wellington Pier opened in 1854 and Britannia Pier in 1858. Through the 20th century, Yarmouth was a booming resort, with a promenade, pubs, trams, fish-and-chip shops and theatres, and the Pleasure Beach, the Sea Life Centre, the Hippodrome Circus and the Time and Tide Museum, and a surviving Victorian seaside Winter Garden in cast iron and glass.

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