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British StandardBS 7671"Requirements for Electrical Installations. IET Wiring Regulations", informally called in the electrical communityThe "Regs", is the national standard in theUnited Kingdomfor electrical installation and the safety ofelectrical wiringin domestic, commercial, industrial, and other buildings, also in special installations and locations, such as marinas or caravan parks and medical locations[1]

In general, BS 7671 applies to circuits supplied at nominal voltages (Uo) up to and including 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC. The standard therefore covers the Extra Low Voltage (ELV) range (0-50V AC, 0-125V DC), and the Low Voltage (LV) range (50-1000V AC, 125-1500V DC). The frequencies covered for AC are 50 Hz, 60 Hz, and 400 Hz, used in the UK for houses, offices, and commerce. It did not become a recognizedBritish Standarduntil the publication of the 16th edition in 1992. The standard takes account of the technical substance of agreements reached inCENELEC.[2]

The current version is BS 7671:2018 (the 18th Edition) issued in 2018 and came into effect from 1 January 2019.[3]Amendment 1 to the 18th Edition was published in February 2020 but the only changes were to section 722 (Electric Vehicle Charging Installations). These changes came into immediate effect upon publication release, unlike previous amendments where 6 months elapsed before changes became compliant.[4]BS 7671 is also used as a national standard byMauritius,St Lucia,Saint Vincent and the Grenadines,Sierra Leone,Singapore,Sri Lanka,Trinidad and Tobago,Uganda,Cyprus, and several other countries, which base their wiring regulations on

​Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs.) is a county in the East Midlands of England, with a long coastline on the North Sea to the east. It borders Norfolk to the south-east, Cambridgeshire to the south, Rutland to the south-west, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire to the west, South Yorkshire to the north-west, and the East Riding of Yorkshire to the north. It also borders Northamptonshire in the south for just 20 yards (19 m), England's shortest county boundary.[2] The county town is the city of Lincoln, where the county council has its headquarters.

The ceremonial county of Lincolnshire consists of the non-metropolitan county of Lincolnshire and the area covered by the unitary authorities of North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire. Part of the ceremonial county is in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and most is in the East Midlands region. The county is the second-largest of the English ceremonial counties and one that is predominantly agricultural in land use. The county is fourth-largest of the two-tier counties, as the unitary authorities of North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire are not included.

The county has several geographical sub-regions, including the rolling chalk hills of the Lincolnshire Wolds. In the south-east are the Lincolnshire Fens (south-east Lincolnshire), the Carrs (similar to the Fens but in north Lincolnshire), the industrial Humber Estuary and North Sea coast around Grimsby and Scunthorpe, and in the south-west of the county, the Kesteven Uplands, rolling limestone hills in the district of South Kesteven.