Banner Default Image

British StandardBS 7671"Requirements for Electrical Installations. IET Wiring Regulations", informally called in the electrical communityThe "Regs", is the national standard in theUnited Kingdomfor electrical installation and the safety ofelectrical wiringin domestic, commercial, industrial, and other buildings, also in special installations and locations, such as marinas or caravan parks and medical locations[1]

In general, BS 7671 applies to circuits supplied at nominal voltages (Uo) up to and including 1000 volts AC or 1500 volts DC. The standard therefore covers the Extra Low Voltage (ELV) range (0-50V AC, 0-125V DC), and the Low Voltage (LV) range (50-1000V AC, 125-1500V DC). The frequencies covered for AC are 50 Hz, 60 Hz, and 400 Hz, used in the UK for houses, offices, and commerce. It did not become a recognizedBritish Standarduntil the publication of the 16th edition in 1992. The standard takes account of the technical substance of agreements reached inCENELEC.[2]

The current version is BS 7671:2018 (the 18th Edition) issued in 2018 and came into effect from 1 January 2019.[3]Amendment 1 to the 18th Edition was published in February 2020 but the only changes were to section 722 (Electric Vehicle Charging Installations). These changes came into immediate effect upon publication release, unlike previous amendments where 6 months elapsed before changes became compliant.[4]BS 7671 is also used as a national standard byMauritius,St Lucia,Saint Vincent and the Grenadines,Sierra Leone,Singapore,Sri Lanka,Trinidad and Tobago,Uganda,Cyprus, and several other countries, which base their wiring regulations on

​Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbərə, -ˌbʌrə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 202,110 in 2017.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 76 miles (122 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. Peterborough is also the largest city and borough in Cambridgeshire and the East Anglia area of England.

The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.

The population grew rapidly after the railways arrived in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly known for its brick manufacture. After the Second World War, growth was limited until designation as a New Town in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is under way. Industrial employment has fallen since then, a significant proportion of new jobs being in financial services and distribution.