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-        An appropriate professional (or trade) accreditation (e.g. Level 3 City & Guilds 2230 or equivalent apprenticeship, 18th Edition of IEE regulations).

-        2391 Test and Inspection or equivalent.

-        A full driving licence.

-        Fire Alarm Installation / Maintenance (desirable).

-        Emergency lighting maintenance & remedial works (desirable).

-        Ability to diagnose faults and report findings accurately.

-        Practical knowledge and experience of electrical maintenance, including power supplies, lighting and alarm systems, motors, controls and portable appliances.

-        Both single-phase and three-phase systems.

-        Maintaining and updating professional knowledge and keeping abreast of current market trends.

-        Door Access Systems (desirable).

-        Suggesting and introducing energy efficiency and sustainability measures, methods, products and devices (desirable).

-        Sustainability / Energy Management (desirable).

-        Working on a large and varied estate (desirable).

-        Working in a School or further education environment (desirable).

-        Working as a multi-trade team on refurbishment projects (desirable).

-        Fire alarm installation and maintenance (desirable).

-        A self-motivated, solution-based team player able to work with minimum supervision.

-        Proactive approach to problem solving.

-        Good timekeeping.

-        Team player.

-        Able to prioritise and manage a varied workload.

-        Available for call-out duties.

-        An eye for detail and quality and a sympathetic approach to historic buildings.

-        Physically fit and able to carry out all duties.

-        Able to work as part of a team.

-        Positive, flexible and can-do attitude.

-        Excellent communication skills.

-        Willingness to learn new skills.

-        Ability to deal with students, staff and members of the public in a polite and helpful manner.

-        Tact and discretion.

-        Logical approach to problem solving.

​Market Harborough is a market town within the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England. It is situated in the far southeast of the county, forming part of the border with Northamptonshire.

Harborough District has a population of 91,461 (2017)[1] and Market Harborough is the district's administrative headquarters.[2] It sits on the Northamptonshire-Leicestershire border. The town was formerly at a crossroads for both road and rail; however the A6 now bypasses the town to the east and the A14 which carries east-west traffic is 6 miles (9.7 km) to the south. Market Harborough railway station is served by East Midlands Railway services on the Midland Main Line with direct services north to Leicester, Nottingham, Derby and Sheffield and south to London St Pancras. Rail services to Rugby and Peterborough ended in 1966.

Market Harborough is located in an area which was formerly a part of the Rockingham Forest, a royal hunting forest used by the medieval monarchs starting with William I. Rockingham Road takes its name from the forest. The forest's original boundaries stretched from Market Harborough through to Stamford and included the settlements at Corby, Kettering, Desborough, Rothwell, Thrapston and Oundle.

The steeple of St Dionysius' Church rises directly from the street, as there is no churchyard. It was constructed in grey stone in 1300 with the church itself a later building of about 1470. Next to the church stands the Old Grammar School, a small timber building dating from 1614. The ground floor is open, creating a covered market area and there is a single room on the first floor. It has become a symbol of the town. The nearby square is largely pedestrianised and surrounded by buildings of varying styles. The upper end of the High Street is wide and contains mostly unspoiled Georgian buildings.

Market Harborough has two villages within its confines: Great Bowden lies over a hill about a mile from the town centre; Little Bowden is less than half a mile from the town centre. The three centres have largely coalesced through ribbon development and infill, although Great Bowden continues to retain a strong village identity.

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