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Fibre

​Fibre-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of infrared light[1] through an optical fibre. The light is a form of carrier wave that is modulated to carry information.[2] Fibre is preferred over electrical cabling when high bandwidth, long distance, or immunity to electromagnetic interference is required.[3] This type of communication can transmit voice, video, and telemetry through local area networks or across long distances.[4]

Optical fibre is used by many telecommunications companies to transmit telephone signals, Internet communication, and cable television signals. Researchers at Bell Labs have reached a record bandwidth–distance product of over 100 petabit × kilometers per second using fibre-optic communication.[5]

​Norfolk (/ˈnɔːrfək/) is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and to the northwest, The Wash. The county town is the city of Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km2). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).[4]

The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk. The area is not a national park[5] although it is marketed as such. It has similar status to a national park, and is protected by the Broads Authority.[6]