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Fire Industry Association

​The FIA is the largest fire protection trade association in the UK with 1000+ members.

We are a not-for-profit organisation and a major provider of fire safety training.

Our objective is to promote, improve and perfect fire protection methods, devices, services and apparatus.

We achieve this through the representation of our members, providing technical support, guidance and opportunities for professional advancement through education and appropriate regulation.

2021 Annual ReportVIDEO

2021 Annual Report

We promote and shape legislation and the professional standards of the fire industry through close liaison with government and official bodies, as well as other key stakeholders.

We also provide funding for research projects in line with our principal objectives.

To receive all the latest updates from the FIA and the wider fire protection industry, sign up to our email news service.

​Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbərə, -ˌbʌrə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 202,110 in 2017.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 76 miles (122 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. Peterborough is also the largest city and borough in Cambridgeshire and the East Anglia area of England.

The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.

The population grew rapidly after the railways arrived in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly known for its brick manufacture. After the Second World War, growth was limited until designation as a New Town in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is under way. Industrial employment has fallen since then, a significant proportion of new jobs being in financial services and distribution.