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A well-maintained property doesn’t only mean having clean facilities and working building systems. The space outside of the building itself has to also be subjected to regular maintenance. 

This is where grounds maintenance comes into play to ensure the property surrounding the facilities is functional and leaves a good first impression.

If you continue reading this article, you will learn:

  • what does ground maintenance covers

  • which organizations need it the most

  • what is the core of a grounds maintenance team

  • and where to find grounds maintenance services

What does grounds maintenance cover?

There are many types of outdoor spaces. As such, grounds maintenance covers a wide variety of different services which includes a lot of seasonal work and has 3 main purposes:

  1. create a pleasant outdoor environment

  2. ensure a functional outdoor environment

  3. preserve property value

Here is an extensive list of tasks that are performed as a part of ground maintenance:

  • lawn maintenance (grass cutting, scarifying, edging…)

  • hedge cutting and maintenance

  • tree works (tree planting, felling, surgery…)

  • plantingartificial grass

  • fencing

  • gutter clearance

  • pruning, weeding, and cultivation of shrub beds

  • gardening and pest control

  • irrigation system maintenance and repair

  • snow clearance and grit application

  • cleansing of open spaces (picking up litter, emptying bins, etc.)

  • maintenance of hard surfaces (like basketball and tennis courts)

​Glossop is a market town in the High Peak, Derbyshire, England, 12 miles (19 km) east of Manchester, 24 miles (39 km) northwest of Sheffield and 32 miles (51 km) north of the county town, Matlock, near Derbyshire's borders with Cheshire, Greater Manchester, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. It is between 150 and 300 metres (492 and 984 ft) above mean sea level, and lies just outside the Peak District National Park.

Historically, the name Glossop refers to the small hamlet that gave its name to an ancient parish recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, and then the manor given by William I of England to William Peverel. A municipal borough was created in 1866, and the unparished urban area within two local government wards.[1] The area now known as Glossop approximates to the villages that used to be called Glossopdale, on the lands of the Duke of Norfolk. Originally a centre of wool processing, Glossop rapidly expanded in the late 18th century when it specialised in the production and printing of calico, a coarse cotton, and became a mill town with many chapels and churches, its fortunes tied to the cotton industry.

Architecturally, the area is dominated by buildings constructed of the local sandstone. There remain two significant former cotton mills and the Dinting railway viaduct. Glossop has transport links to Manchester, making the area popular for commuters.

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