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A well-maintained property doesn’t only mean having clean facilities and working building systems. The space outside of the building itself has to also be subjected to regular maintenance. 

This is where grounds maintenance comes into play to ensure the property surrounding the facilities is functional and leaves a good first impression.

If you continue reading this article, you will learn:

  • what does ground maintenance covers

  • which organizations need it the most

  • what is the core of a grounds maintenance team

  • and where to find grounds maintenance services

What does grounds maintenance cover?

There are many types of outdoor spaces. As such, grounds maintenance covers a wide variety of different services which includes a lot of seasonal work and has 3 main purposes:

  1. create a pleasant outdoor environment

  2. ensure a functional outdoor environment

  3. preserve property value

Here is an extensive list of tasks that are performed as a part of ground maintenance:

  • lawn maintenance (grass cutting, scarifying, edging…)

  • hedge cutting and maintenance

  • tree works (tree planting, felling, surgery…)

  • plantingartificial grass

  • fencing

  • gutter clearance

  • pruning, weeding, and cultivation of shrub beds

  • gardening and pest control

  • irrigation system maintenance and repair

  • snow clearance and grit application

  • cleansing of open spaces (picking up litter, emptying bins, etc.)

  • maintenance of hard surfaces (like basketball and tennis courts)

​Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbərə, -ˌbʌrə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 202,110 in 2017.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 76 miles (122 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. Peterborough is also the largest city and borough in Cambridgeshire and the East Anglia area of England.

The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.

The population grew rapidly after the railways arrived in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly known for its brick manufacture. After the Second World War, growth was limited until designation as a New Town in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is under way. Industrial employment has fallen since then, a significant proportion of new jobs being in financial services and distribution.