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A well-maintained property doesn’t only mean having clean facilities and working building systems. The space outside of the building itself has to also be subjected to regular maintenance. 

This is where grounds maintenance comes into play to ensure the property surrounding the facilities is functional and leaves a good first impression.

If you continue reading this article, you will learn:

  • what does ground maintenance covers

  • which organizations need it the most

  • what is the core of a grounds maintenance team

  • and where to find grounds maintenance services

What does grounds maintenance cover?

There are many types of outdoor spaces. As such, grounds maintenance covers a wide variety of different services which includes a lot of seasonal work and has 3 main purposes:

  1. create a pleasant outdoor environment

  2. ensure a functional outdoor environment

  3. preserve property value

Here is an extensive list of tasks that are performed as a part of ground maintenance:

  • lawn maintenance (grass cutting, scarifying, edging…)

  • hedge cutting and maintenance

  • tree works (tree planting, felling, surgery…)

  • plantingartificial grass

  • fencing

  • gutter clearance

  • pruning, weeding, and cultivation of shrub beds

  • gardening and pest control

  • irrigation system maintenance and repair

  • snow clearance and grit application

  • cleansing of open spaces (picking up litter, emptying bins, etc.)

  • maintenance of hard surfaces (like basketball and tennis courts)

​St Neots /sɛnʔ ˈniːəts/[b] is a town and civil parish in the Huntingdonshire District of the county of Cambridgeshire, England, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of central London. The town straddles the River Great Ouse and is served by a railway station on the East Coast Main Line. It is 14 miles (23 km) west of Cambridge, to which it is linked by the A428 arterial road. It is the largest town in Cambridgeshire and had a population of 30,811 in the 2011 census.[c]

The town is named after the Cornish monk Saint Neot, whose bones were moved to the Priory here from the hamlet of St Neot on Bodmin Moor in around 980 AD. Pilgrimage to the priory church and parish church brought prosperity to the settlement and the town was granted a market charter in 1130. In the 18th and 19th centuries the town enjoyed further prosperity through corn milling, brewing, stagecoach traffic and railways.

After the Second World War the town and its industry were chosen for rapid growth as London councils paid for new housing to be built to rehouse families from London. The first London overspill housing was completed in the early 1960s and new housing has continued at a slightly lower rate such that the population, including the areas transferred from Bedfordshire, is approximately four times that of the 1920s.

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