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Horticultureis the art of cultivating plants in gardens to produce food and medicinal ingredients, or for comfort and ornamental purposes. Horticulturists areagriculturistswho grow flowers, fruits and nuts, vegetables and herbs, as well as ornamental trees and lawns.[1][2][3]

The study and practice of horticulture have been traced back thousands of years. Horticulture contributed to the transition from nomadic human communities to sedentary, or semi-sedentary, horticultural communities.[4]Horticulture is divided into several categories which focus on the cultivation and processing of different types of plants and food items for specific purposes. In order to conserve the science of horticulture, multiple organizations worldwide educate, encourage, and promote the advancement of horticulture. Some notable horticulturists include Luca Ghini, Luther Burbank, and Tony Avent.

​Grimsby, also Great Grimsby, is a large coastal English seaport and administrative centre in North East Lincolnshire, on the South Bank of the Humber Estuary, close to where it reaches the North Sea. It was the home port for the world's largest fishing fleet by the mid-20th century,[1] but fishing fell sharply after the Cod Wars denied the United Kingdom access to Icelandic fishing grounds, and the European Union parcelled out fishing quotas in waters within a 200-nautical-mile (370 km) limit of the UK coast to other European countries, in line with its Common Fisheries Policy. Grimsby has since suffered post-industrial decline,[2] although food production has spread since the 1990s. The Grimsby–Cleethorpes conurbation acts as a cultural and economic centre for much of north and east Lincolnshire. Grimsby people are called Grimbarians;[3] the term codhead is also used jokingly, often for Grimsby football supporters.[4][5][6][7][8] Great Grimsby Day is 22 January.[3]

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