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​You will be a confident, proactive and structured individual with experience in a broad range of matters including:-

 Handling a caseload

 Producing standard contract documentation

 Dealing with enquiries.

 Exchange, completion and post-completion work (including Stamp Duty Land Tax, Companies House and Land Registry registrations)

 File closures

Key Duties and Responsibilities:

 Providing outstanding levels of service to developer clients.

 Liaising with and supporting other members of the team.

 Meeting financial targets and agreed objectives.

 Working accurately, reliably and in accordance with the Specialist New Build Estates Department’s procedures, quality and risk management procedures.

 Communicating with clients at all levels from the Group Sales Director to site sales staff.

 Maintaining and enhancing relationships with existing developer clients.

 Promoting the firm and developing new business.

 Adept at being able to work under pressure.

 Perform fee earning work accurately, reliably and in accordance with the firms’ quality and risk procedures.

​Rutland (/ˈrʌtlənd/) is a landlocked county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire.

Its greatest length north to south is only 18 miles (29 km) and its greatest breadth east to west is 17 miles (27 km). It is the smallest historic county in England and the fourth smallest in the UK as a whole. Because of this, the Latin motto Multum in Parvo or "much in little" was adopted by the county council in 1950.[2] It has the smallest population of any normal unitary authority in England. Among the current ceremonial counties, the Isle of Wight, City of London and City of Bristol are smaller in area. The former County of London, in existence 1889 to 1965, also had a smaller area. It is 323rd of the 326 districts in population.

The only towns in Rutland are Oakham, the county town, and Uppingham. At the centre of the county is Rutland Water, a large artificial reservoir that is an important nature reserve serving as an overwintering site for wildfowl and a breeding site for ospreys.

Rutland's older cottages are built from limestone or ironstone and many have roofs of Collyweston stone slate or thatch.