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​Maintain Equipment

Depending on the seniority of the role, plant engineers may be involved in monitoring and maintaining plant equipment and machinery to ensure that it’s running as it should be. Entry-level plant engineers are typically responsible for fixing any mechanical issues with the equipment.

Train Plant Personnel

Senior plant engineers train and assist plant personnel in carrying out safety and quality control procedures so that everyone on the team is compliant with the appropriate regulations. They also deal with any administrative tasks that coincide with this training, such as completing reports or updating records.

Review Project Plans

Plant engineers review project plans to ensure that timelines and blueprints are accurate and that cost estimates tie in with the budget. They also interpret developments along the way and provide advice and guidance for any necessary changes.

Ensure the Facility Complies with Regulations

Plant engineers are responsible for ensuring the facility is compliant with the relevant regulations and that regular check-ups are carried out to verify that machinery and processes are safe.

Develop Operational Plans

Plant engineers develop operational plans for projects at different facilities, such as renovation or construction, maintenance, and machine installation.

​Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbərə, -ˌbʌrə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 202,110 in 2017.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 76 miles (122 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. Peterborough is also the largest city and borough in Cambridgeshire and the East Anglia area of England.

The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.

The population grew rapidly after the railways arrived in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly known for its brick manufacture. After the Second World War, growth was limited until designation as a New Town in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is under way. Industrial employment has fallen since then, a significant proportion of new jobs being in financial services and distribution.