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Salesforce CRM

​Salesforce's products include several customer relationship management (CRM) technologies, including: Sales Cloud,[33] Service Cloud,[34] Marketing Cloud,[35] and Commerce Cloud and Platform.[35] Additional technologies include Slack, MuleSoft, Tableau Analytics, and Trailhead.

Main services

Salesforce's main technologies are tools for customer management. Other products enable customers to create apps, integrate data from other systems, visualize data, and offer training courses.[36]

Salesforce Platform

Salesforce Platform[37] (formerly known as Force.com) is a platform as a service (PaaS) that allows developers to create add-on applications that integrate into the main Salesforce.com application.[38][failed verification] These third-party applications are hosted on Salesforce.com's infrastructure.[39]

Force.com applications are built using declarative tools, backed by Lightning[further explanation needed] and Apex, a proprietary Java-like programming language for Force.com,[40] as well as Visualforce, a framework[41] including an XML[42] syntax typically used to generate HTML. The Force.com platform typically receives three complete releases a year.[43] As the platform is provided as a service to its developers, every single development instance also receives all these updates.

In 2015, a new framework for building user interfaces – Lightning Components – was introduced in beta.[44] Lightning components are built using the open-source Aura Framework[45] but with support for Apex as the server-side language instead of Aura's JavaScript dependency. This has been described as an alternative to, not necessarily a replacement for, Visualforce pages.[46]

As of 2014, the Force.com platform has 1.5 million registered developers.[47]

Lightning Base Components is the component library built on top of Lightning Web Components.[48]

AppExchange

Launched in 2005, the Salesforce AppExchange is an online application marketplace that connects customers with third-party applications and consulting services.[49][50] As of 2021, the exchange has over 5,000 apps listed.[51][52]

Trailhead

Launched in 2014, Trailhead is a free online learning platform with courses focused on Salesforce technologies.[53][54][15]

Salesforce+

In August 2021, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Salesforce launched a streaming service titled Salesforce+[b]. The service features original content produced by the company involving its clients ranging from "days in the life" of smaller business owners to interviews with large companies' CEOs. Since 2022, Salesforce has also streamed its annual Dreamforce conference on Salesforce+.[55][56]

Discontinued

Desk.com logo

Desk.com Logo

Desk.com

Desk.com is a SaaS help desk and customer support product that was acquired by Salesforce for $50 million in 2011.[57] The product focused on connecting small businesses to their customers.[57][58]

In March 2018, Salesforce announced that Desk.com would be consolidated with other services into Service Cloud Essentials.[59]

Do.com

Do.com was a cloud-based task management system for small groups and businesses, introduced in 2011 and discontinued in 2014.[60][61][62]

​Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbərə, -ˌbʌrə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 202,110 in 2017.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 76 miles (122 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. Peterborough is also the largest city and borough in Cambridgeshire and the East Anglia area of England.

The local topography is flat, and in some places the land lies below sea level, for example in parts of the Fens to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation. The Anglo-Saxon period saw the establishment of a monastery, Medeshamstede, which later became Peterborough Cathedral.

The population grew rapidly after the railways arrived in the 19th century, and Peterborough became an industrial centre, particularly known for its brick manufacture. After the Second World War, growth was limited until designation as a New Town in the 1960s. Housing and population are expanding and a £1 billion regeneration of the city centre and immediately surrounding area is under way. Industrial employment has fallen since then, a significant proportion of new jobs being in financial services and distribution.