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​Aschoolis aneducational institutiondesigned to providelearning spacesandlearning environmentsfor the teaching ofstudents(or "pupils") under the direction of teachers. Most countries have systems of formaleducation, which is sometimescompulsory.[2]In these systems, students progress through a series of schools. The names for these schools vary by country (discussed in theRegionalsection below) but generally includeprimary schoolfor young children andsecondary schoolfor teenagers who have completed primary education. An institution wherehigher educationis taught, is commonly called auniversity collegeoruniversity.

In addition to these core schools, students in a given country may also attend schools before and after primary (Elementary in the US) and secondary (Middle school in the US) education.Kindergartenorpreschoolprovide some schooling to very young children (typically ages 3–5).University,vocational school,collegeorseminarymay be available after secondary school. A school may be dedicated to one particular field, such as a school of economics or a school of dance.Alternative schoolsmay provide nontraditional curriculum and methods.

Non-government schools, also known as private schools[3]may be required when the government does not supply adequate, or specific educational needs. Other private schools can also be religious, such asChristian schools,gurukula(Hindu School),madrasa(Arabic schools),hawzas(Shi'i Muslim schools),yeshivas(Jewish schools), and others; or schools that have a higher standard of education or seek to foster other personal achievements. Schools for adults include institutions ofcorporate training,military education and trainingandbusiness schools.

Inhomeschoolinganddistance education, teaching and learning take place independent from the institution of school or in avirtual schooloutside a traditional school building respectively. Schools are commonly organized in several differentorganizational models, including departmental, small learning communities, academies, integrated, and schools-within-a-school.

​Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs.) is a county in the East Midlands of England, with a long coastline on the North Sea to the east. It borders Norfolk to the south-east, Cambridgeshire to the south, Rutland to the south-west, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire to the west, South Yorkshire to the north-west, and the East Riding of Yorkshire to the north. It also borders Northamptonshire in the south for just 20 yards (19 m), England's shortest county boundary.[2] The county town is the city of Lincoln, where the county council has its headquarters.

The ceremonial county of Lincolnshire consists of the non-metropolitan county of Lincolnshire and the area covered by the unitary authorities of North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire. Part of the ceremonial county is in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and most is in the East Midlands region. The county is the second-largest of the English ceremonial counties and one that is predominantly agricultural in land use. The county is fourth-largest of the two-tier counties, as the unitary authorities of North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire are not included.

The county has several geographical sub-regions, including the rolling chalk hills of the Lincolnshire Wolds. In the south-east are the Lincolnshire Fens (south-east Lincolnshire), the Carrs (similar to the Fens but in north Lincolnshire), the industrial Humber Estuary and North Sea coast around Grimsby and Scunthorpe, and in the south-west of the county, the Kesteven Uplands, rolling limestone hills in the district of South Kesteven.