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​Aschoolis aneducational institutiondesigned to providelearning spacesandlearning environmentsfor the teaching ofstudents(or "pupils") under the direction of teachers. Most countries have systems of formaleducation, which is sometimescompulsory.[2]In these systems, students progress through a series of schools. The names for these schools vary by country (discussed in theRegionalsection below) but generally includeprimary schoolfor young children andsecondary schoolfor teenagers who have completed primary education. An institution wherehigher educationis taught, is commonly called auniversity collegeoruniversity.

In addition to these core schools, students in a given country may also attend schools before and after primary (Elementary in the US) and secondary (Middle school in the US) education.Kindergartenorpreschoolprovide some schooling to very young children (typically ages 3–5).University,vocational school,collegeorseminarymay be available after secondary school. A school may be dedicated to one particular field, such as a school of economics or a school of dance.Alternative schoolsmay provide nontraditional curriculum and methods.

Non-government schools, also known as private schools[3]may be required when the government does not supply adequate, or specific educational needs. Other private schools can also be religious, such asChristian schools,gurukula(Hindu School),madrasa(Arabic schools),hawzas(Shi'i Muslim schools),yeshivas(Jewish schools), and others; or schools that have a higher standard of education or seek to foster other personal achievements. Schools for adults include institutions ofcorporate training,military education and trainingandbusiness schools.

Inhomeschoolinganddistance education, teaching and learning take place independent from the institution of school or in avirtual schooloutside a traditional school building respectively. Schools are commonly organized in several differentorganizational models, including departmental, small learning communities, academies, integrated, and schools-within-a-school.

​Northampton /nɔːrˈθæmptən/ (About this soundlisten) is a large market town and the county town of Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England. It lies on the River Nene, 60 miles (97 km) north-west of London and 50 miles (80 km) south-east of Birmingham.[2][3] One of the largest towns (as opposed to cities) in England,[4] it had a population of 212,100 at the 2011 census (223,000 est. 2019).

Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates to the Bronze Age, Romans and Anglo-Saxons. In the Middle Ages, the town rose to national significance with the establishment of Northampton Castle, an occasional royal residence which regularly hosted the Parliament of England. Medieval Northampton had many churches, monasteries and the University of Northampton, all enclosed by the town walls. It was granted a town charter by Richard I in 1189 and a mayor was appointed by King John in 1215. The town was also the site of two medieval battles, in 1264 and 1460.

Northampton supported the Parliamentary Roundheads in the English Civil War, and Charles II ordered the destruction of the town walls and most of the castle. The Great Fire of Northampton in 1675 destroyed much of the town. It was soon rebuilt and grew rapidly with the industrial development of the 18th century. Northampton continued to grow with the arrival of the Grand Union Canal and the railways in the 19th century, becoming a centre for footwear and leather manufacture.

Northampton's growth was limited until it was designated as a New Town in 1968, accelerating development in the town. It unsuccessfully applied for city status in 2000.[5]

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