Banner Default Image

​. To manage the relationships at a senior level with our key stakeholders, principally the
Naval Service, the prime contractor (Capita Plc), the other sub-contractors (Fujitsu,
Elbit and Raytheon), the MOD Training Teams and the University’s various
departments;
2. To ensure successful delivery of the services outlined in our contract with Capita Plc,
to be delivered on their behalf to the Royal Navy and Royal Marines. This will include
adherence to defined key performance indicators (KPIs) and service level agreements
(SLAs).
To achieve success in delivery, the post holder will take the lead in devising and delivering
the strategy for Project Selborne, including a long-term strategic plan and KPIs and annual
plans and targets. Responsible for the planning of all activities they will lead project
implementation, the planning and monitoring of progress, including the achievement of KPIs
and targets, management of the Risk Register, and the identification and monitoring of
corrective actions.

​Rutland (/ˈrʌtlənd/) is a landlocked county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire.

Its greatest length north to south is only 18 miles (29 km) and its greatest breadth east to west is 17 miles (27 km). It is the smallest historic county in England and the fourth smallest in the UK as a whole. Because of this, the Latin motto Multum in Parvo or "much in little" was adopted by the county council in 1950.[2] It has the smallest population of any normal unitary authority in England. Among the current ceremonial counties, the Isle of Wight, City of London and City of Bristol are smaller in area. The former County of London, in existence 1889 to 1965, also had a smaller area. It is 323rd of the 326 districts in population.

The only towns in Rutland are Oakham, the county town, and Uppingham. At the centre of the county is Rutland Water, a large artificial reservoir that is an important nature reserve serving as an overwintering site for wildfowl and a breeding site for ospreys.

Rutland's older cottages are built from limestone or ironstone and many have roofs of Collyweston stone slate or thatch.