Banner Default Image

A foreman is the main link between our clients shop floor team and management team. The foreman is responsible for the team’s day to day activities, ensuring smooth and efficient performance and achievement of goals. The foreman should handle the day to day challenges and work under the direction of the Service Operations Manager to provide direction to the shop floor engineering team.

Main Responsibilities:

  • Give toolbox talks and actively raise safe systems of work including risk assessments, embracing the company’s core value of 'Safety First’;

  • Investigate near misses, accidents and quality issues with a focus on root cause analysis;

  • Supervise the activities of the industrial workshop facility with direct accountability for labour, materials, plant and equipment;

  • Monitor stock levels of consumables and equipment;

  • Chair workshop floor meetings, motivating and driving the team, working to a project plan and budget;

  • Ensure legible audit trail in line with defined quality and manufacturing procedures, e.g. weld maps, weld logs and root cards;

  • Conduct inspection of equipment and monitor quality and service performance, duly raising and addressing any non-conformance;

  • Maintenance of tools and equipment, ensuring cleanliness and safety;

  • Conduct and control work, being a pillar of knowledge for the team, with the ability to provide technical training and direction to subordinates.

​Glossop is a market town in the High Peak, Derbyshire, England, 12 miles (19 km) east of Manchester, 24 miles (39 km) northwest of Sheffield and 32 miles (51 km) north of the county town, Matlock, near Derbyshire's borders with Cheshire, Greater Manchester, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. It is between 150 and 300 metres (492 and 984 ft) above mean sea level, and lies just outside the Peak District National Park.

Historically, the name Glossop refers to the small hamlet that gave its name to an ancient parish recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, and then the manor given by William I of England to William Peverel. A municipal borough was created in 1866, and the unparished urban area within two local government wards.[1] The area now known as Glossop approximates to the villages that used to be called Glossopdale, on the lands of the Duke of Norfolk. Originally a centre of wool processing, Glossop rapidly expanded in the late 18th century when it specialised in the production and printing of calico, a coarse cotton, and became a mill town with many chapels and churches, its fortunes tied to the cotton industry.

Architecturally, the area is dominated by buildings constructed of the local sandstone. There remain two significant former cotton mills and the Dinting railway viaduct. Glossop has transport links to Manchester, making the area popular for commuters.

Latest jobs