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A foreman is the main link between our clients shop floor team and management team. The foreman is responsible for the team’s day to day activities, ensuring smooth and efficient performance and achievement of goals. The foreman should handle the day to day challenges and work under the direction of the Service Operations Manager to provide direction to the shop floor engineering team.

Main Responsibilities:

  • Give toolbox talks and actively raise safe systems of work including risk assessments, embracing the company’s core value of 'Safety First’;

  • Investigate near misses, accidents and quality issues with a focus on root cause analysis;

  • Supervise the activities of the industrial workshop facility with direct accountability for labour, materials, plant and equipment;

  • Monitor stock levels of consumables and equipment;

  • Chair workshop floor meetings, motivating and driving the team, working to a project plan and budget;

  • Ensure legible audit trail in line with defined quality and manufacturing procedures, e.g. weld maps, weld logs and root cards;

  • Conduct inspection of equipment and monitor quality and service performance, duly raising and addressing any non-conformance;

  • Maintenance of tools and equipment, ensuring cleanliness and safety;

  • Conduct and control work, being a pillar of knowledge for the team, with the ability to provide technical training and direction to subordinates.

​Great Yarmouth, often called Yarmouth, is a seaside resort and minster town in Norfolk, England, straddling the River Yare, some 20 miles (30 km) east of Norwich.[2] A population of 38,693 in the 2011 Census made it Norfolk's third most populous place. Its fishing industry, mainly for herring, fell steeply after the mid-20th century and has all but vanished.[3] North Sea oil from the 1960s brought an oil-rig supply industry that now services offshore natural gas rigs. More recent offshore wind power and other renewable energy have created further support services. Yarmouth has been a seaside resort since 1760 and a gateway from the Norfolk Broads to the North Sea. Tourism was boosted when a railway opened in 1844, which gave visitors easier, cheaper access and triggered some settlement. Wellington Pier opened in 1854 and Britannia Pier in 1858. Through the 20th century, Yarmouth was a booming resort, with a promenade, pubs, trams, fish-and-chip shops and theatres, and the Pleasure Beach, the Sea Life Centre, the Hippodrome Circus and the Time and Tide Museum, and a surviving Victorian seaside Winter Garden in cast iron and glass.

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