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​Beginning with theIndustrial Revolutionera, aworkshopmay be aroom, rooms orbuildingwhich provides both the area andtools(ormachinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair ofmanufacturedgoods. Workshops were the only places ofproductionuntil the advent ofindustrializationand the development of largerfactories. In the 20th and 21st century, many Western homes contain a workshop in the garage, basement, or an externalshed. Home workshops typically contain a workbench, hand tools, power tools and other hardware. Along with their practical applications for repair goods or do small manufacturing runs, workshops are used totinkerand makeprototypes.[1][2][3]

Workshops may vary in industrial focus. For instance, some workshops may focus on automotive repair or restoration. Woodworking is one of the most common focuses, but metalworking, electronics work, and many types of electronic prototyping may be done.

​Derbyshire (/ˈdɑːrbɪˌʃɪər, -ʃər/[2]) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester to the northwest, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the northeast, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the southeast, Staffordshire to the west and southwest and Cheshire also to the west. Kinder Scout, at 636 metres (2,087 ft), is the highest point in the county, whilst Trent Meadows, where the River Trent leaves Derbyshire, is its lowest point at 27 metres (89 ft).[3]:1[4] The River Derwent is the county's longest river at 66 miles (106 km), and runs roughly north to south through the county.[5] In 2003 the Ordnance Survey placed Church Flatts Farm at Coton in the Elms (near Swadlincote) as the farthest point from the sea in Great Britain.[6][7]

The city of Derby is a unitary authority area, but remains part of the ceremonial county of Derbyshire. The non-metropolitan county contains 30 towns with between 10,000 and 100,000 inhabitants. There is a large amount of sparsely populated agricultural upland: 75% of the population live in 25% of the area.[citation needed]

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