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​Beginning with theIndustrial Revolutionera, aworkshopmay be aroom, rooms orbuildingwhich provides both the area andtools(ormachinery) that may be required for the manufacture or repair ofmanufacturedgoods. Workshops were the only places ofproductionuntil the advent ofindustrializationand the development of largerfactories. In the 20th and 21st century, many Western homes contain a workshop in the garage, basement, or an externalshed. Home workshops typically contain a workbench, hand tools, power tools and other hardware. Along with their practical applications for repair goods or do small manufacturing runs, workshops are used totinkerand makeprototypes.[1][2][3]

Workshops may vary in industrial focus. For instance, some workshops may focus on automotive repair or restoration. Woodworking is one of the most common focuses, but metalworking, electronics work, and many types of electronic prototyping may be done.

​Warwick (/ˈwɒrɪk/ WOR-ik) is a market town and county town of Warwickshire, England. It lies near the River Avon, 11 miles (18 km) south of Coventry and west of Leamington Spa and Whitnash. Its population was 31,345 in 2011. Signs of Neolithic activity precede unbroken habitation to the 6th century AD. It was a Saxon burh in the 9th century; Warwick Castle was built during the Norman conquest of England. Warwick School claims to be the country's oldest boys' school. The earldom of Warwick, created in 1088, controlled the town and built its walls, of which Eastgate and Westgate survive. The castle became a fortress, then a mansion. The Great Fire of Warwick in 1694 destroyed much of the town. Warwick missed industrialisation, but the population has grown almost sixfold since 1801.

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